Tag Archives: Training

Medical Scribe Program at AHDPG

Check out our short video about our Medical Scribe Program on YouTube  and see if you are as excited as we are.  Give us a call today to find out more.  Ask for Lynn, our Admission Coordinator.

 

 

AHDPG is proud to be named a Military Friendly School for the 6th year in a row!

Welcome to Our Military Personnel and Their Spouses!

AHDPG is proud to once again be named a Military Friendly School for 2015. This is our 6th consecutive year winning this distinction and something the entire team at AHDPG is extremely proud of. Now in its sixth year, the 2015 list of Military Friendly Schools ® was compiled through extensive research and a data-driven survey of more than 12,000 VA-approved schools nationwide. The survey tabulation process, methodology and weightings that comprise the 2015 list were independently verified by Ernst and Young LLP. Each year schools taking the survey are held to a higher standard than the previous year via improved methodology, criteria and weightings developed with the assistance of an Academic Advisory Board (AAB) consisting of educators from schools across the country.

AHDPG is an active participant in the activities of the U.S. Department of Defense to promote medical transcription as a viable occupation for military spouses.

Military Spouses Jobs and Training
Those who dedicate their lives to service for our country and risk their lives while separated from their families are often acknowledged. We see the stories of our military all over the media, and at AHDPG, we are proud of those who choose this life of service for our country.

Military Spouses Jobs and Training
There is another important segment of this group, however, and that is the often-forgotten military spouse. In the same way that the military personnel give of themselves, so too does the military spouse. Benefits of a healthcare documentation position for a Military spouse:

• Portable profession (take the job anywhere your spouse is stationed)
• Work at home opportunities
• No more feelings of being uprooted from a job

We have a heart for the military and the military spouses. Simply put, we know the challenges you face as a military spouse and we welcome you to AHDPG!

*MyCAA funding program administered by the
U.S. Department of Defense and Military Onesource*

Military Spouse Training http://www.ahdpg.com/military.shtml
Call today for more information. Ask for Lynn.

Medical Billing and Coding Professions, Which one is best for you?

By: Karen Mooney, MBA, BS, CPC, CPC-I, CMSCS, CHI

There is a large misconception from those that are just entering into the medical administration field.  Many people believe that billers and coders are one in the same.  In reality, there is a big difference on the focus between these two categories.  A medical biller is focused on data entry of claims, claims processing, claims follow up, accounts receivable, patient billing, and collections.  Billers also make very strong registration specialists and front desk staff.  A medical biller is a strong strength when it comes to collecting funds due by the patient at the time of appointments as they know what to look for.  Billers are also great enforcers of referrals and authorizations that may be necessary for payment of services.  One other avenue that could work for a biller would be working in the health information department as billers are trained on HIPAA requirements and the need for completed medical records.

When a person is considering a coding profession, there is much more challenge in this aspect due to the level of knowledge that is necessary to perform the duties of a coder.  A coder must understand the working knowledge of the ICD-9-CM as well as the CPT coding reference. Coders are responsible for making sure that when coding services and procedures that the diagnosis that has been provided supports the medical necessity for the service before these are forwarded for processing.  Medical Coders hold a very large responsibility in their hands when performing their daily duties and are completely responsible for what they code.  Coders can find work in physician offices, clinics, hospitals with the right background of training.  From there, coders become quality reviewers, advanced educators, auditors, and consultants.

When individuals are researching new careers, the medical profession is a great choice as there is a long line of stability in the medical profession.  With that said, locating the best focused training is very important to a person’s success.  History has proven that the most direct route into medical administration is through the billing side of the profession.  This provides a great passageway into the field and allows many opportunities to a new comer to the medical field. Practices and physicians are more likely to hire individuals that are right out of school for a billing position versus a coding position.  The reason for this is that the coders hold a large responsibility of a physician’s revenue in their day to day process. Physicians are completely aware of this fact and are less apt to hire a person, right out of school without any live experience in the coding realm.

When researching your career path, and you are looking to learn to become a Medical Biller, then you want to focus on a program that will be sure to provide you with the background knowledge of the types of insurances, patient’s responsibilities, what can and cannot be processed from a billing side of the process and still covering an introduction of ICD-9 and CPT coding.  An introduction to ICD-9 and CPT does not make a biller qualified to work as a coder.  If you are looking to become a coder, be sure that the program offers you an entire review of the CPT coding reference. This process should be a minimum of 3 months to accomplish the course you are looking at.  If you decide that a medical biller and coder is the program that you are interested in, the program should be a minimum of 9 months to ensure that you have learned the skills necessary for both specialties. The most direct process is to become a biller and introduce yourself to the profession in the billing community, build experience, continue to code, then work your way into a coding position within the profession.  Ultimately the final decision is yours.  You need to make the best decision for reaching your final goal. Just remember that anything worthwhile is worth working towards.

Electronic Encoders: Friend or Foe?

In today’s day and age, everything seems to be about technology, instant gratification, quicker turn around as well as more for less.  I can say that I have seen and worked within the concept of “more for less” for many years and it just seems to be the nature of our society today, or so it would seem.  So as we look at the transition of health care and the migration of medical records to electronic health records, this has actually managed to create a new vein of career paths in the health care field within our environment, which is great.  Along these same lines now emerges electronic encoders.  It is the opinion of this blog writer that encoders are positive and negative in a few different ways in the coding world for the profession coder and I am going to share why.

Encoders are great tools to help increase production standards because you can save time searching for your codes by having the system do the work for you.  They have built in references that are wonderful to have at your fingertips and not have to leave your work station to locate or search the all mighty web.  Not all working environments give their employees access to the internet so the fact that the encoder programs could possibly provide medical dictionaries, CPT Assistants, drug listings, Coding Clinics, anatomy diagrams, ICD-9 guidelines, and GEM guidelines would be invaluable to the work flow for a coder.  Not to mention the space it would safe from having all of these references in the work space.  Some encoders also come with other administrative functions that assist us to conduct research on specific procedures as well as individual payer information.  So there are some real great benefits that come with an encoder software package, depending on what is purchased and implemented in the working environment.

So you probably are wondering then, why would I even be asking why an encoding product would be a Foe in the world of a coder?  Here is my reason why.  Coding is a skill that we work extremely hard to learn and perfect.  Hours, months and years of time go into learning what we know and how we do what we do in our line of work.  Encoders are a great tool but can also spoil and ruin us as coders, if we allow them to.  If a coder becomes too reliant on an encoder, this is a bad thing.  If a coder becomes to “comfortable” coding with an encoder, this is a bad thing.  A coder needs to use their skills that they have built or they lose these skills over time.  They may not lose them completely but they can become very rusty for sure.  It is good practice to still manually code from time to time.  It is good for the brain to keep your fingers in your coding references so you remember how your books work, where to find everything, keeping your skills fresh on crosswalks and modifiers.

Things to keep in mind is that even if your working environment is using an encoding product, not everything in the coding world is and remember that to maintain your coding certification, you have tom complete continuing education credits.  Many of these continuing education credits are manual coding exercises.  If you look to gain any additional certifications above the certifications you already carry, these will be manual coding exams.  Not to mention, it is really difficult to put your personal coding notes in an encoder program but you have the luxury to place them anywhere you would like in your personal coding reference.